Design

Crochet trend: the well-fashioned luminaries by Naomi Paul

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Trendy hook, the well-fashioned luminaries of Naomi Paul

Nick Rochowski

With its retro spirit, the knitting returns in force, as much on the podiums as in deco. Naomi Paul draws perfectly the thread of the trend with its purified lighting, it comes in muted hues or pastel.

Naomi Paul's lights explore the trend of knitting. Crocheted in classic or japonizing shapes, colored or pastel, these suspensions reinforce the image of the craftsmanship in the interior decoration. An ode to craftsmanship, the legacy of the handmade.

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Naomi draws as much inspiration from Japanese lanterns as from classic lampshades.

Nick Rochowski Photography

A complex creation that incorporates the codes of craftsmanship

In East London, in a neighborhood that never stops mutating, Naomi Paul is one of those makers who have placed the British capital at the heart of this formidable enterprise of (re) conquest that is the handmade handmade. Its hooked lights appeal to both individuals and professionals - the Pullman and Conran Contract hotels, to name but a few. Or how the hook, nicely regressive, made its revolution by becoming material in vogue. Graduated in Graphic Design at Central Saint Martins and then at the University of Art and Design in Chelsea, Naomi reinvents the traditional approach by adding rigor and attention to detail at every stage of production. Until their slightly waxed finish, the suspension wires have been the subject of long research: their tension and their rigidity being essential to the final aesthetics of the luminaire. Even before arriving in the workshop at Bethnal Green, the Egyptian mercerized cotton is tinted in Italy and then knitted in yarn in Lancashire. Nothing is left to chance. To make a luminaire, we work a single cotton thread, which wraps itself on a hand-rolled frame made of copper-plated steel by one of the last camper makers in England. The smallest suspension requires five hours of work; the most complex parts can take three to four months.

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Hanging "Hannah", Naomi Paul.

Nick Rochowski Photography

Suspension "V2 Gluck", Naomi Paul.

Nick Rochowski Photography

Naomi Paul or the heritage of crafts

Born in Sussex, Naomi grew up in the middle of nature and in contact with local artisans, two essential sources of inspiration for her. The creative and manual approach has always been part of his thinking. Thanks to the OMI collection, Naomi has been awarded by many actors in the world of decoration and furnishing. The timelessness of her creations lies in this simple, sensitive approach, linked to a personal heritage.

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The "Gluck", "V2 Gluck" and "Hannah" suspensions offer different volumes and luminosities.

Nick Rochowski

naomipaul.co.uk

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